Oritse-Femi

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The star opened up in a recent interview on his two baby mamas, his fiancée and his new-found success.

Musician, Oritsefemi has become a household name after the release of his Fela-inspired song, ‘Double Wahala’.

The star opened up in an interview with Vanguard on his two baby mamas, his fiancée and his new-found success.

Oritse Femi Explains Why He Won’t Marry Any Of His Baby Mamas

Excerpts below:

Your song, ‘Double Wahala’ was a hit. What actually inspired it?

I got the inspiration from God. Everything you want to do, you definitely put God first. Before I came out with ‘Double Wahala’, I was receiving low responses from my fans. I tried my best, but my fans did not identify with my songs. I had to go back to the drawing board to review my style of music.

What was life like before “Double Wahala”?

I was comfortable but things got better when I released it.

A lot of your fans are confused about your marital status. For the record, are you married officially?

Honestly, for now, I am not married. But definitely, I am going to get married very soon. I have a fiancée and we have been together for close to two years now.

But you have children?

Yes, I have two beautiful daughters who are between ten and nine years. I have a family and I’m from a polygamous home. I have a responsibility as a father.

Isn’t your fiance the mother of your two daughters?

No. My two daughters are from different mothers and I am not marrying any of them.

What happened?

It’s a long story. Back in time, as a street boy, growing up in the ghetto city of Ajegunle, I had some childhood girlfriends who got pregnant.

Then, I had no means of livelihood to sustain them. But I ensured that I took care of my kids right from when they were born. Unfortunately, I couldn’t take care of their mothers because of my financial status then. But now, that God has elevated me, I am planning to take my children abroad.

Before this success, what were you doing?

I was struggling. I was on the streets, hustling to make ends meet. I actually stayed away from my family. I couldn’t depend on my dad, because he had his own challenges as a polygamist.

That was why at 14 years, I went into the street to hustle. I hawked in the street. My dad was an engineer, and he taught me how to dismantle and repair boat engines. I learnt all that.

How did growing up in Ajegunle influence your lifestyle and music?

I actually grew up in Tolu which is one of the worse areas to live in Ajegunle. I experienced all types of miserable lifestyles, but I survived them all. Today, I am a role model to a lot of the Ajegunle youths. I used to counsel them that if I could make it, they too, can make it.